Shingrix (Zoster Vaccine) is the most common vaccine used to prevent the development of herpes zoster, or shingles. 


Herpes zoster is a painful, skin eruption that occurs due to reactivation of the varicella zoster virus in the body. A painful complication of shingles is postherpetic neuralgia, a persistent pain that can last for at least 90 days following the disappearance of the herpes rash. According to the CDC, it is estimated that over 1 million cases of shingles occur each year. There is also another live form of the vaccine called, Zostavax (Live/Attenuated), that is used less often.  


There are two commonly used pneumococcal vaccines, Prevnar13 and Pneumovax23, used to protect against pneumonia.  Prevnar13 protects against 13 common strains of bacteria that cause pneumonia. Pneumovax23 protects against 23 common strains of bacteria that can cause pneumonia. Your doctor or other healthcare provider will help determine which vaccine is best for you.


Shingrix With Prevnar Or Pneumovax

It is safe to get the Shingrix and Prevnar13 or Pneumovax23 vaccines at the same time.  The drug manufacturer of Pneumovax23 recommends that when also getting the Zostavax vaccine, that the doses be separated by 4 weeks.  In regards to getting over bronchitis, you must be recovered from the bronchitis with no active fever.  It is best if you check with your doctor to see if he or she feels it is ok to get the vaccines at this time.  


Common side effects will depend upon which vaccines you receive.  Here are the most common side effects experienced with each vaccine:


Shingrix (Zoster Vaccine)
  • Pain, redness and swelling at injection site
  • Myalgia or muscle pain
  • Fatigue
  • Headache
  • Fever
  • Gastrointestinal symptoms


Zostavax (Live/Attenuated)
  • Pain, redness, swelling and itching at injection site
  • Headache 
  • Diarrhea


Prevnar13
  • Pain, swelling and redness at injection site
  • Fatigue
  • Headache
  • Muscle pain
  • Joint pain
  • Decrease of appetite
  • Vomiting
  • Fever
  • Chills


Pneumovax23
  • Pain, redness and soreness at injection site
  • Headache
  • Fatigue
  • Myalgia or muscle pain


In conclusion, you may want to get the vaccines before school starts assuming your doctor considers you recovered from your bronchitis.  This way, if you have some soreness in your arm(s), you will not have to deal with this while at school.  Also, any other possible side effects are usually short lasting and mild for most people.