School RxIn my experience, the pharmacy school you go to is not a major factor in terms of opportunity for better jobs, residencies etc... Certainly not as important as some other degrees such as law or business degrees. Having said that, alumni networks can be very important when looking for opportunities when you leave school. It is important to find a school that you are passionate about attending and can get involved with the schools programs, network with staff and fellow students etc...


Most students, when they graduate, move into the workforce (e.g.  community or hospital pharmacy) or apply for a residency. The most important thing you can do in school that can set you up for future success is the following:


  • Pharmacy experience: Most states require that you work in a pharmacy to get intern hours, but the more experience you have the better. Try to get multiple experience in different locations (e.g. retail, hospital, managed care). This can go a long way when trying to get hired in different fields. 


  • Networking: This is especially important if you plan on applying for a residency. Most residency programs require at least three references. Be sure to do activities in school that allow you to network with accomplished people in the field that can write positive things about you in a letter of recommendation.


  • Misc: It is becoming more common for both employers and residency programs to require you to submit a curriculum vitae (CV), which is basically a more involved resume that includes all your job experience, professional experience and other information about yourself as it pertains to the profession. Try to set yourself apart by publishing research or publishing articles pertaining your field.


School choice is all about fit and where you feel you can accomplish the most. I wouldn't worry too much about the 'prestige' of a specific pharmacy school. Just make sure the school is a ACPE‐accredited school of pharmacy.