Cannabidiol


Description

Cannabidiol, or CBD, is one of at least 85 active cannabinoids identified within the Cannabis plant. It is a major phytocannabinoid, accounting for up to 40% of the Cannabis plant's extract, that binds to a wide variety of physiological targets of th...

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Pharmacology

Indication

When used in combination with delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol as the product Sativex, cannabidiol was g... Read more

Pharmacodynamic

Although the exact mechanism and magnitude of effects of THC and CBD are not fully understood, CBD h... Read more

Mechanismofaction

The exact mechanism of action of CBD and THC is not currently fully understood. However, it is known... Read more

Absorption

Following a single buccal administration, maximum plasma concentrations of both CBD and THC typicall... Read more

Proteinbinding

Information currently not available.

Volumeofdistribution

Cannabinoids are distributed throughout the body; they are highly lipid soluble and accumulate in fa... Read more

Clearance

Information currently not available.

Halflife

The CBD component of sublingual Sativex was found to have a half life (t1/2) of 1.44hr, while buccal... Read more

Routeofelimination

Elimination from plasma is bi-exponential with an initial half-life of one to two hours. The termina... Read more

Toxicity

Information currently not available.


Adverse Effects

Effect Regions Age Groups Incidences Evidence Type

Contraindications

Information currently not available.

Food Interactions

    Information currently not available.

Interactions

Type in a drug name to check for interaction with Cannabidiol

The risk or severity of adverse effects can be increased when Cannabidiol is combined with (R)-warfarin.
The risk or severity of adverse effects can be increased when Cannabidiol is combined with (S)-Warfarin.
The risk or severity of hypertension can be increased when 1-(3-Mercapto-2-Methyl-Propionyl)-Pyrrolidine-2-Carboxylic Acid is combined with Cannabidiol.
The risk or severity of hypertension can be increased when 1-benzylimidazole is combined with Cannabidiol.
The risk or severity of serotonin syndrome can be increased when 2,5-Dimethoxy-4-ethylamphetamine is combined with Cannabidiol.
The risk or severity of adverse effects can be increased when Cannabidiol is combined with 2,5-Dimethoxy-4-ethylthioamphetamine.
Cannabidiol may increase the excretion rate of 3-isobutyl-1-methyl-7H-xanthine which could result in a lower serum level and potentially a reduction in efficacy.
The metabolism of 3,5-diiodothyropropionic acid can be decreased when combined with Cannabidiol.
The risk or severity of adverse effects can be increased when Cannabidiol is combined with 4-Bromo-2,5-dimethoxyamphetamine.
The risk or severity of adverse effects can be increased when Cannabidiol is combined with 4-Bromo-2,5-dimethoxyphenethylamine.
The metabolism of 4-hydroxycoumarin can be decreased when combined with Cannabidiol.
The risk or severity of adverse effects can be increased when Cannabidiol is combined with 4-Methoxyamphetamine.
The metabolism of Cannabidiol can be decreased when combined with 5-androstenedione.
The risk or severity of adverse effects can be increased when Cannabidiol is combined with 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine.
The metabolism of Cannabidiol can be decreased when combined with 6-Deoxyerythronolide B.
Cannabidiol may increase the excretion rate of 6-O-benzylguanine which could result in a lower serum level and potentially a reduction in efficacy.
Cannabidiol may increase the excretion rate of 7-Deazaguanine which could result in a lower serum level and potentially a reduction in efficacy.
The metabolism of Cannabidiol can be decreased when combined with 7-ethyl-10-hydroxycamptothecin.
The risk or severity of adverse effects can be increased when Cannabidiol is combined with 7-Nitroindazole.
The risk or severity of adverse effects can be increased when Cannabidiol is combined with 7,8-Dichloro-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline.

References

  • 1 . Ibeas Bih C, Chen T, Nunn AV, Bazelot M, Dallas M, Whalley BJ: Molecular Targets of Cannabidiol in Neurological Disorders. Neurotherapeutics. 2015 Oct;12(4):699-730. doi: 10.1007/s13311-015-0377-3. [PubMed: 26264914]
  • 2 . Zhornitsky S, Potvin S: Cannabidiol in humans-the quest for therapeutic targets. Pharmaceuticals (Basel). 2012 May 21;5(5):529-52. doi: 10.3390/ph5050529. [PubMed: 24281562]
  • 3 . Ujvary I, Hanus L: Human Metabolites of Cannabidiol: A Review on Their Formation, Biological Activity, and Relevance in Therapy. Cannabis Cannabinoid Res. 2016 Mar 1;1(1):90-101. doi: 10.1089/can.2015.0012. eCollection 2016. [PubMed: 28861484]
  • 4 . Ruggiero RN, Rossignoli MT, De Ross JB, Hallak JEC, Leite JP, Bueno-Junior LS: Cannabinoids and Vanilloids in Schizophrenia: Neurophysiological Evidence and Directions for Basic Research. Front Pharmacol. 2017 Jun 21;8:399. doi: 10.3389/fphar.2017.00399. eCollection 2017. [PubMed: 28680405]
  • 5 . Laprairie RB, Bagher AM, Kelly ME, Denovan-Wright EM: Cannabidiol is a negative allosteric modulator of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor. Br J Pharmacol. 2015 Oct;172(20):4790-805. doi: 10.1111/bph.13250. Epub 2015 Oct 13. [PubMed: 26218440]
  • 6 . Pertwee RG: The diverse CB1 and CB2 receptor pharmacology of three plant cannabinoids: delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabidiol and delta9-tetrahydrocannabivarin. Br J Pharmacol. 2008 Jan;153(2):199-215. doi: 10.1038/sj.bjp.0707442. Epub 2007 Sep 10. [PubMed: 17828291]
  • 7 . MacCallum CA, Russo EB: Practical considerations in medical cannabis administration and dosing. Eur J Intern Med. 2018 Mar;49:12-19. doi: 10.1016/j.ejim.2018.01.004. Epub 2018 Jan 4. [PubMed: 29307505]
  • 8 . Baron EP: Comprehensive Review of Medicinal Marijuana, Cannabinoids, and Therapeutic Implications in Medicine and Headache: What a Long Strange Trip It's Been .... Headache. 2015 Jun;55(6):885-916. doi: 10.1111/head.12570. Epub 2015 May 25. [PubMed: 26015168]
  • 9 . Kaur R, Ambwani SR, Singh S: Endocannabinoid System: A Multi-Facet Therapeutic Target. Curr Clin Pharmacol. 2016;11(2):110-7. [PubMed: 27086601]
  • 10 . Elsohly MA, Slade D: Chemical constituents of marijuana: the complex mixture of natural cannabinoids. Life Sci. 2005 Dec 22;78(5):539-48. doi: 10.1016/j.lfs.2005.09.011. Epub 2005 Sep 30. [PubMed: 16199061]
  • 11 . Sharma P, Murthy P, Bharath MM: Chemistry, metabolism, and toxicology of cannabis: clinical implications. Iran J Psychiatry. 2012 Fall;7(4):149-56. [PubMed: 23408483]
  • 12 . Zou S, Kumar U: Cannabinoid Receptors and the Endocannabinoid System: Signaling and Function in the Central Nervous System. Int J Mol Sci. 2018 Mar 13;19(3). pii: ijms19030833. doi: 10.3390/ijms19030833. [PubMed: 29533978]
  • 13 . Yang KH, Galadari S, Isaev D, Petroianu G, Shippenberg TS, Oz M: The nonpsychoactive cannabinoid cannabidiol inhibits 5-hydroxytryptamine3A receptor-mediated currents in Xenopus laevis oocytes. J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 2010 May;333(2):547-54. doi: 10.1124/jpet.109.162594. Epub 2010 Feb 16. [PubMed: 20160007]
  • 14 . Yamaori S, Okushima Y, Masuda K, Kushihara M, Katsu T, Narimatsu S, Yamamoto I, Watanabe K: Structural requirements for potent direct inhibition of human cytochrome P450 1A1 by cannabidiol: role of pentylresorcinol moiety. Biol Pharm Bull. 2013;36(7):1197-203. [PubMed: 23811569]
  • 15 . Health Canada Product Label [Link]
  • 16 . New York Times: F.D.A. Panel Recommends Approval of Cannabis-Based Drug for Epilepsy (April 2018) [Link]
  • 17 . GW Pharmaceuticals Announces Positive Phase 3 Pivotal Study Results for Epidiolex (cannabidiol) [Link]
  • 18 . FDA Briefing Document - Peripheral and Central Nervous System Drugs Advisory Committee Meeting (April 19, 2018) [Link]

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