Description

Simple

A medication used to prevent development of Hepatitis B if given immediately after potential infection.

Clinical

An injection of immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies to prevent the development of chronic Hepatitis B infection.

Overview

Long-term hepatitis B immune globulin (HBIG) has been shown to reduce hepatitis B virus (HBV) reinfection in patients transplanted for hepatitis B. Infection with hepatitis B may lead to hepatocellular carcinoma, a type of liver cancer. Therefore, the hepatitis-B vaccines are cancer-preventing vaccines. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the hepatitis B vaccine was the first anti-cancer vaccine.

HBIG is prepared from the plasma of donors who have high antibody levels of the hepatitis B surface antigen. It is extracted from the Cohn fraction II. During the process, viruses are deactivated, and in the final steps, solvents used in the preparation are removed. The preparation is tested for absence of HIV, HCV, herpes virus, and reovirus.

Pharmacology

Indication

Investigated for use/treatment in hepatitis (viral, B), liver transplant surgery, and pediatric indications.

Pharmacodynamic

Information currently not available.

Mechanism of action

In countries with high rates of hepatitis B infection, vaccination of newborns has not only reduced the risk of infection, but has also led to marked reduction in liver cancer.

Absorption

Information currently not available.

Protein binding

Information currently not available.

Volume of distribution

Information currently not available.

Clearance

Information currently not available.

Half life

Information currently not available.

Route of elimination

Information currently not available.

Toxicity

Information currently not available.

Adverse Effects

Contraindications

Information currently not available.

Food Interactions

    Information currently not available.

Interactions

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  • Paracetamol(acetaminophen)
  • Paxil(paroxetine)
  • Pamelor(nortriptyline)
  • Panadol(acetaminophen)
  • Patanol(olopatadine ophthalmic)
  • Pataday(olopatadine ophthalmic)
  • Parnate(tranylcypromine)
  • Pazeo(olopatadine ophthalmic)
1 References
  1. 1 . Ghany MG, Ayola B, Villamil FG, Gish RG, Rojter S, Vierling JM, Lok AS: Hepatitis B virus S mutants in liver transplant recipients who were reinfected despite hepatitis B immune globulin prophylaxis. Hepatology. 1998 Jan;27(1):213-22.PubMed: 9425940