Description

Simple

A medication used to improve the quality of images seen during a medical test called an MRI (or magnetic resonance imaging) that helps to see problems in different parts of the body.

Clinical

A gadolinium compound used as a contrast agent in MRIs.

Overview

Gadobenic acid (in the form of gadobenate dimeglumine) is an MRI contrast agent used primarily for MR imaging of the liver. It can also be used for visualizing the CNS and heart. In contrast to conventional extracellular fluid contrast agents, gadobenate dimeglumine is characterized by a weak and transient binding capacity to serum proteins. This binding leads to an increased relaxivity of gadobenate dimeglumine and, consequently, to a considerably increased signal intensity over that of other agents.

Pharmacology

Indication

Gadobenate Dimeglumine is an MRI contrast agent used primarily for MR imaging of the liver. It can also be used for MRI of the heart, as well as and central nervous system in adults to visualize lesions with abnormal brain vascularity or abnormalities in the blood brain barrier, the brain, spine, or... Read more

Pharmacodynamic

Gadobenate dimeglumine shares the pharmacokinetic properties of the ECF contrast agent gadopentetate dimeglumine; however, gadobenate differs in that is also selectively taken-up by hepatocytes and excreted via the bile (up to 5% of dose). The elimination half-life of gadobenate dimeglumine is appro... Read more

Mechanism of action

Based on the behavior of protons when placed in a strong magnetic field, which is interpreted and transformed into images by magnetic resonance (MR) instruments. Paramagnetic agents have unpaired electrons that generate a magnetic field about 700 times larger than the proton's field, thus disturbing... Read more

Absorption

Information currently not available.

Protein binding

Plasma protein binding is low, weak, and transient.

Volume of distribution

Information currently not available.

Clearance

0.093 +/- 0.010 L/hr/kg [healthy male subjects receiving 3 single-dose IV administration with doses from 0.005-0.4 mmol/kg]

Half life

1 hour

Route of elimination

Gadobenate ion is eliminated predominately via the kidneys, with 78% to 96% of an administered dose recovered in the urine.

Toxicity

Gadolinium-based radiocontrast agents like gadobenate dimeglumine are cytotoxic to renal cells. The toxic effects include apoptosis, cellular energy failure, disruption of calcium homeostasis, and disturbance of tubular cell polarity, and are thought to be linked to oxidative stress.

Adverse Effects

Contraindications

Information currently not available.

Food Interactions

    Information currently not available.

Interactions

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  • Paracetamol(acetaminophen)
  • Paxil(paroxetine)
  • Pamelor(nortriptyline)
  • Panadol(acetaminophen)
  • Patanol(olopatadine ophthalmic)
  • Pataday(olopatadine ophthalmic)
  • Parnate(tranylcypromine)
  • Pazeo(olopatadine ophthalmic)
Abacavir
Gadobenic acid may decrease the excretion rate of Abacavir which could result in a higher serum level.
Abexinostat
The risk or severity of QTc prolongation can be increased when Gadobenic acid is combined with Abexinostat.
Acarbose
Acarbose may decrease the excretion rate of Gadobenic acid which could result in a higher serum level.
Acebutolol
The risk or severity of QTc prolongation can be increased when Gadobenic acid is combined with Acebutolol.
Aceclofenac
Aceclofenac may decrease the excretion rate of Gadobenic acid which could result in a higher serum level.
Acemetacin
Acemetacin may decrease the excretion rate of Gadobenic acid which could result in a higher serum level.
Aceprometazine
The risk or severity of QTc prolongation can be increased when Gadobenic acid is combined with Aceprometazine.
Acetaminophen
Acetaminophen may decrease the excretion rate of Gadobenic acid which could result in a higher serum level.
Acetazolamide
Acetazolamide may increase the excretion rate of Gadobenic acid which could result in a lower serum level and potentially a reduction in efficacy.
Acetyldigoxin
The risk or severity of QTc prolongation can be increased when Acetyldigoxin is combined with Gadobenic acid.
Acetylsalicylic acid
Acetylsalicylic acid may decrease the excretion rate of Gadobenic acid which could result in a higher serum level.
Aclidinium
Gadobenic acid may decrease the excretion rate of Aclidinium which could result in a higher serum level.
Acrivastine
The risk or severity of QTc prolongation can be increased when Acrivastine is combined with Gadobenic acid.
Acyclovir
Acyclovir may decrease the excretion rate of Gadobenic acid which could result in a higher serum level.
Adefovir
Adefovir may decrease the excretion rate of Gadobenic acid which could result in a higher serum level.
Adefovir dipivoxil
Adefovir dipivoxil may decrease the excretion rate of Gadobenic acid which could result in a higher serum level.
Adenosine
The risk or severity of QTc prolongation can be increased when Adenosine is combined with Gadobenic acid.
Ajmaline
The risk or severity of QTc prolongation can be increased when Ajmaline is combined with Gadobenic acid.
Albutrepenonacog alfa
Gadobenic acid may decrease the excretion rate of Albutrepenonacog alfa which could result in a higher serum level.
Alclofenac
Alclofenac may decrease the excretion rate of Gadobenic acid which could result in a higher serum level.
6 References
  1. 1 . de Haen C, Cabrini M, Akhnana L, Ratti D, Calabi L, Gozzini L: Gadobenate dimeglumine 0.5 M solution for injection (MultiHance) pharmaceutical formulation and physicochemical properties of a new magnetic resonance imaging contrast medium. J Comput Assist Tomogr. 1999 Nov;23 Suppl 1:S161-8.PubMed: 10608412
  2. 2 . Morana G, Salviato E, Guarise A: Contrast agents for hepatic MRI. Cancer Imaging. 2007 Oct 1;7 Spec No A:S24-7.PubMed: 17921081
  3. 3 . Vogl TJ, Pegios W, McMahon C, Balzer J, Waitzinger J, Pirovano G, Lissner J: Gadobenate dimeglumine--a new contrast agent for MR imaging: preliminary evaluation in healthy volunteers. AJR Am J Roentgenol. 1992 Apr;158(4):887-92.PubMed: 1546612
  4. 4 . Kirchin MA, Pirovano GP, Spinazzi A: Gadobenate dimeglumine (Gd-BOPTA). An overview. Invest Radiol. 1998 Nov;33(11):798-809.PubMed: 9818314
  5. 5 . Clement O, Siauve N, Cuenod CA, Vuillemin-Bodaghi V, Leconte I, Frija G: Mechanisms of action of liver contrast agents: impact for clinical use. J Comput Assist Tomogr. 1999 Nov;23 Suppl 1:S45-52.PubMed: 10608397
  6. 6 . Sweetman, Sean C. (2009). Contrast Media. In Martindale : The Complete Drug Reference, 36th Edition 2 Volume Set (36th ed., pp. 1478). Pharmaceutical Press.