Description

Simple

A medication used to treat inflammation, immune reactions, hormone conditions, and abnormal cell growth.

Clinical

A corticosteroid used to treat inflammation or immune-mediated reactions and to treat endocrine or neoplastic diseases.

Overview

A synthetic anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid derived from [cortisone].[1] It is biologically inert and converted to [prednisolone] in the liver.[9]

Prednisone was granted FDA approval on 21 February 1955.[8]

Pharmacology

Indication

Prednisone is indicated as an anti-inflammatory or immunosuppressive drug for allergic, dermatologic, gastrointestinal, hematologic, ophthalmologic, nervous system, renal, respiratory, rheumatologic, infectious, endocrine, or neoplastic conditions as well as in organ transplant.[ Read more

Pharmacodynamic

Corticosteroids bind to the glucocorticoid receptor, inhibiting pro-inflammatory signals, and promoting anti-inflammatory signals.[1] Prednisone has a short duration of action as the... Read more

Mechanism of action

Prednisone is first metabolized in the liver to its active form, prednisolone, a glucocorticoid agonist corticosteroid.[9]

The short term effects of corticostero... Read more

Absorption

Oral prednisone has a Tmax of 2 hours, while the delayed-release formulation has a Tmax of 6-6.5 hours.[9] A 5mg dose of prednisone has an AUC... Read more

Protein binding

Corticosteroids are generally bound to corticosteroid binding globulin[ Read more

Volume of distribution

Data regarding the volume of distribution for prednisone is not readily available.[9] However, a 0.15mg/kg dose of prednisolone has a volume of distribution of 29.3... Read more

Clearance

Data regarding the clearance of prednisone is not readily available.[9]A 5.5µg/h/kg infusion of prednisolone has an average clearance of 0.066±0.12L/h/kg, while a 0... Read more

Half life

Prednisone and its active metabolite [prednisolone] have half lives of 2-3 hours from both immediate and delayed release preparations.[9]

Route of elimination

Prednisone is excreted mainly in the urine as sulfate and glucuronide conjugates.[9]

Toxicity

Data regarding acute overdoses of prednisone are rare but prolonged high doses of prednisone can lead to a higher incidence and severity of adverse effects such as mental symptoms, moon face, abnormal fat deposits, fluid retention, excessive appetite, weight gain, hypertrichosis, acne, striae, ecchy... Read more

Adverse Effects

Contraindications

  • Hypersensitivity:
    • true
  • Regions: US
  • Regions: US
  • Patient Conditions:
      • Name: Systemic fungal infection
      • Drugbank Id: DBCOND0100019
      • Modification Of:
        • Location: Systemic
        • Base:
          • Name: Fungal Infection
          • Drugbank Id: DBCOND0031276

Food Interactions

  • Avoid alcohol.
  • Take with food. Food reduces irritation.

Interactions

Type in a drug name to check for interaction with Prednisone
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  • Paracetamol(acetaminophen)
  • Paxil(paroxetine)
  • Pamelor(nortriptyline)
  • Panadol(acetaminophen)
  • Patanol(olopatadine ophthalmic)
  • Pataday(olopatadine ophthalmic)
  • Parnate(tranylcypromine)
  • Pazeo(olopatadine ophthalmic)
(R)-warfarin
Prednisone may increase the anticoagulant activities of (R)-warfarin.
(S)-Warfarin
Prednisone may increase the anticoagulant activities of (S)-Warfarin.
1-Testosterone
The risk or severity of edema formation can be increased when 1-Testosterone is combined with Prednisone.
1,10-Phenanthroline
The therapeutic efficacy of 1,10-Phenanthroline can be decreased when used in combination with Prednisone.
16-Bromoepiandrosterone
The risk or severity of edema formation can be increased when 16-Bromoepiandrosterone is combined with Prednisone.
19-norandrostenedione
The risk or severity of edema formation can be increased when 19-norandrostenedione is combined with Prednisone.
1alpha-Hydroxyvitamin D5
The therapeutic efficacy of 1alpha-Hydroxyvitamin D5 can be decreased when used in combination with Prednisone.
1alpha,24S-Dihydroxyvitamin D2
The therapeutic efficacy of 1alpha,24S-Dihydroxyvitamin D2 can be decreased when used in combination with Prednisone.
2-Methoxyethanol
The risk or severity of adverse effects can be increased when Prednisone is combined with 2-Methoxyethanol.
2,4-thiazolidinedione
The risk or severity of hyperglycemia can be increased when Prednisone is combined with 2,4-thiazolidinedione.
4-hydroxycoumarin
Prednisone may increase the anticoagulant activities of 4-hydroxycoumarin.
4-Hydroxytestosterone
The risk or severity of edema formation can be increased when 4-Hydroxytestosterone is combined with Prednisone.
5-androstenedione
The risk or severity of edema formation can be increased when 5-androstenedione is combined with Prednisone.
6-Deoxyerythronolide B
The serum concentration of Prednisone can be increased when it is combined with 6-Deoxyerythronolide B.
9-(N-methyl-L-isoleucine)-cyclosporin A
The risk or severity of adverse effects can be increased when Prednisone is combined with 9-(N-methyl-L-isoleucine)-cyclosporin A.
Abacavir
Prednisone may decrease the excretion rate of Abacavir which could result in a higher serum level.
Abatacept
The risk or severity of adverse effects can be increased when Prednisone is combined with Abatacept.
Abediterol
The risk or severity of hypokalemia can be increased when Prednisone is combined with Abediterol.
Abetimus
The risk or severity of adverse effects can be increased when Prednisone is combined with Abetimus.
Acarbose
The risk or severity of hyperglycemia can be increased when Prednisone is combined with Acarbose.
9 References
  1. 1 . Yasir M, Sonthalia S: Corticosteroid Adverse Effects .PubMed: 30285357
  2. 2 . Czock D, Keller F, Rasche FM, Haussler U: Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of systemically administered glucocorticoids. Clin Pharmacokinet. 2005;44(1):61-98. doi: 10.2165/00003088-200544010-00003.PubMed: 15634032
  3. 3 . Frey BM, Frey FJ: Clinical pharmacokinetics of prednisone and prednisolone. Clin Pharmacokinet. 1990 Aug;19(2):126-46. doi: 10.2165/00003088-199019020-00003.PubMed: 2199128
  4. 4 . Matabosch X, Pozo OJ, Perez-Mana C, Papaseit E, Segura J, Ventura R: Detection and characterization of prednisolone metabolites in human urine by LC-MS/MS. J Mass Spectrom. 2015 Mar;50(3):633-42. doi: 10.1002/jms.3571.PubMed: 25800201
  5. 5 . Rose JQ, Yurchak AM, Jusko WJ: Dose dependent pharmacokinetics of prednisone and prednisolone in man. J Pharmacokinet Biopharm. 1981 Aug;9(4):389-417. doi: 10.1007/bf01060885.PubMed: 7310640
  6. 6 . Pickup ME: Clinical pharmacokinetics of prednisone and prednisolone. Clin Pharmacokinet. 1979 Mar-Apr;4(2):111-28. doi: 10.2165/00003088-197904020-00004.PubMed: 378499
  7. 7 . Gardill BR, Vogl MR, Lin HY, Hammond GL, Muller YA: Corticosteroid-binding globulin: structure-function implications from species differences. PLoS One. 2012;7(12):e52759. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0052759. Epub 2012 Dec 26.PubMed: 23300763
  8. 8 . FDA Approved Drug Products: Meticorten Prednisone Oral Tablets (Discontinued) Link
  9. 9 . FDA Approved Drug Products: Rayos Prednisone Delayed-Release Oral Tablets Link