Description

Simple

A muscle relaxing medication used short term with physical therapy and other treatments to control uncomfortable and painful symptoms caused by muscle strains and sprains.

Clinical

A CNS depressant indicated with rest, physical therapy and other treatments to control the discomfort associated with various acute musculoskeletal conditions.

Overview

Methocarbamol was developed in the early 1950s as a treatment for muscle spasticity and the associated pain.[6,7] It is a guaiacol glyceryl ether.[7]

Methocarbamol tablets and intramuscular injections are prescription medicines indicated in the United States as an adjunct to rest, physical therapy, and other measures for the relief of discomforts associated with acute, painful musculoskeletal conditions.[Label,9] In Canada, methocarbamol can be sold as an over the counter oral medicine at a lower dose that may be combined with [acetaminophen] or [ibuprofen].[10] A combination product with [acetylsalicylic acid] and [codeine] is available in Canada by prescription.[Read more

Pharmacology

Indication

Methocarbamol tablets and intramuscular injections are indicated in the United States as an adjunct to rest, physical therapy, and other measures for the relief of discomforts associated with acute, painful musculoskeletal conditions.[Label, Read more

Pharmacodynamic

Methacarbamol is a skeletal muscle relaxant with an unknown mechanism of action.[5] Met... Read more

Mechanism of action

The mechanism of action of methocarbamol is thought to be dependant on its central nervous system depressant activity.[ Read more

Absorption

The time to maximum concentration is 1.1 hours for both healthy patients and those on hemodialysis.[ Read more

Protein binding

Methocarbamol is 46-50% protein bound in healthy patients and 47.3-48.9% protein bound in hemodialysis patients.[ Read more

Volume of distribution

Volume of distribution data in humans is scarce. In horses, the volume of distribution is 515-942mL/kg at steady state or 724-1130mL/kg.[ Read more

Clearance

0.2-0.8L/h/kg.[9]

Half life

The elimination half life is 1.14 hours in healthy subjects and 1.24 hours in subjects with renal insufficiency.[ Read more

Route of elimination

In humans the majority of the dose is eliminated in the urine.[2] In dogs, 88.85% of the dose is eliminated in u... Read more

Toxicity

Overdose of methocarbamol may be associated with alcohol and other central nervous system depressants.[Label] Patients may experience nausea, drowsiness, blurred vision, hypotension, seizures, and coma.[Label] Treatment of overdose is generally through airway maintenance, monitoring urinary output,... Read more

Adverse Effects

Contraindications

  • Route:
    • Intramuscular
    • Intravenous
  • Dose Form:
    • Injection
  • Recommended Actions:
    • Avoid
  • Regions: US
  • Patient Conditions:
      • Name: Renal Impairment
      • Drugbank Id: DBCOND0031781
  • Route:
    • Intramuscular
    • Intravenous
    • Oral
  • Dose Form:
    • Injection
    • Tablet
  • Hypersensitivity:
    • true
  • Recommended Actions:
    • Avoid
  • Regions: US

Food Interactions

  • Avoid alcohol.
  • Take with or without food. The absorption is unaffected by food.

Interactions

Type in a drug name to check for interaction with Methocarbamol
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  • Paracetamol(acetaminophen)
  • Paxil(paroxetine)
  • Pamelor(nortriptyline)
  • Panadol(acetaminophen)
  • Patanol(olopatadine ophthalmic)
  • Pataday(olopatadine ophthalmic)
  • Parnate(tranylcypromine)
  • Pazeo(olopatadine ophthalmic)
2,5-Dimethoxy-4-ethylthioamphetamine
The risk or severity of adverse effects can be increased when Methocarbamol is combined with 2,5-Dimethoxy-4-ethylthioamphetamine.
4-Bromo-2,5-dimethoxyamphetamine
The risk or severity of adverse effects can be increased when Methocarbamol is combined with 4-Bromo-2,5-dimethoxyamphetamine.
4-Methoxyamphetamine
The risk or severity of adverse effects can be increased when Methocarbamol is combined with 4-Methoxyamphetamine.
5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine
The risk or severity of adverse effects can be increased when Methocarbamol is combined with 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine.
7-Nitroindazole
The risk or severity of adverse effects can be increased when Methocarbamol is combined with 7-Nitroindazole.
7,8-Dichloro-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline
The risk or severity of adverse effects can be increased when Methocarbamol is combined with 7,8-Dichloro-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline.
Acepromazine
The risk or severity of adverse effects can be increased when Methocarbamol is combined with Acepromazine.
Aceprometazine
The risk or severity of adverse effects can be increased when Methocarbamol is combined with Aceprometazine.
Acetazolamide
The risk or severity of adverse effects can be increased when Methocarbamol is combined with Acetazolamide.
Acetophenazine
The risk or severity of adverse effects can be increased when Methocarbamol is combined with Acetophenazine.
Acetylglycinamide chloral hydrate
The risk or severity of adverse effects can be increased when Methocarbamol is combined with Acetylglycinamide chloral hydrate.
Aclidinium
Methocarbamol may increase the central nervous system depressant (CNS depressant) activities of Aclidinium.
Adinazolam
The risk or severity of adverse effects can be increased when Methocarbamol is combined with Adinazolam.
Adipiplon
The risk or severity of adverse effects can be increased when Methocarbamol is combined with Adipiplon.
Agomelatine
The risk or severity of adverse effects can be increased when Methocarbamol is combined with Agomelatine.
Ajulemic acid
The risk or severity of adverse effects can be increased when Ajulemic acid is combined with Methocarbamol.
Alaproclate
The risk or severity of adverse effects can be increased when Methocarbamol is combined with Alaproclate.
Alcuronium
The risk or severity of adverse effects can be increased when Methocarbamol is combined with Alcuronium.
Alfaxalone
The risk or severity of adverse effects can be increased when Methocarbamol is combined with Alfaxalone.
Alfentanil
The risk or severity of adverse effects can be increased when Methocarbamol is combined with Alfentanil.
10 References
  1. 1 . Sica DA, Comstock TJ, Davis J, Manning L, Powell R, Melikian A, Wright G: Pharmacokinetics and protein binding of methocarbamol in renal insufficiency and normals. Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 1990;39(2):193-4.PubMed: 2253675
  2. 2 . Bruce RB, Turnbull LB, Newman JH: Metabolism of methocarbamol in the rat, dog, and human. J Pharm Sci. 1971 Jan;60(1):104-6.PubMed: 5548215
  3. 3 . Witenko C, Moorman-Li R, Motycka C, Duane K, Hincapie-Castillo J, Leonard P, Valaer C: Considerations for the appropriate use of skeletal muscle relaxants for the management of acute low back pain. P T. 2014 Jun;39(6):427-35.PubMed: 25050056
  4. 4 . Crankshaw DP, Raper C: Mephenesin, methocarbamol, chlordiazepoxide and diazepam: actions on spinal reflexes and ventral root potentials. Br J Pharmacol. 1970 Jan;38(1):148-56. doi: 10.1111/j.1476-5381.1970.tb10343.x.PubMed: 5413283
  5. 5 . Muir WW 3rd, Sams RA, Ashcraft S: The pharmacology and pharmacokinetics of high-dose methocarbamol in horses. Equine Vet J Suppl. 1992 Feb;(11):41-4.PubMed: 9109959
  6. 6 . Authors unspecified: Methocarbamol-A New Lissive Agent. Can Med Assoc J. 1958 Dec 15;79(12):1008-9.PubMed: 20325834
  7. 7 . O'DOHERTY DS, SHIELDS CD: Methocarbamol; new agent in treatment of neurological and neuromuscular diseases. J Am Med Assoc. 1958 May 10;167(2):160-3.PubMed: 13538683
  8. 8 . FDA Approved Drug Products: Robaxin Link
  9. 9 . FDA Approved Drug Products: Robaxin Intramuscular Injection Link
  10. 10 . Pfizer Canada: Robax Link